Focusing on Women's Health from Puberty to Menopause.

Tuesday, 19 March 2013
After the second trimester, it is generally assumed that a pregnancy will end with the joy of a newborn baby. But the reality is that each year in the UK, one in every 200 – or around 4,000 – babies die in the third trimester before, or during, labour. This is one of the highest rates of stillbirth among high-income countries, and each death has profound effects on the woman, her family and health services.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Unplanned pregnancy with poor glycaemic control at conception is associated with major maternal and perinatal complications. However, contraception is used haphazardly by women with diabetes and is often not discussed by diabetes professionals. GPs and practice nurses need to be able to give appropriate advice about contraception to the increasing numbers of women of childbearing age with type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for nonmedical reasons. The practice has no known health benefits, is psychologically and physically harmful, and is a violation of human rights. About 70,000 women and girls living in the UK have had some form of FGM, and 20,000 young girls under the age of 15 years are thought to be at risk either in this country or abroad.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Early detection and timely intervention have reduced maternal deaths from ectopic pregnancy, but women continue to die. New guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) aim to ensure that all health professionals are alert to the possibility of ectopic pregnancy and avoid missed opportunities for diagnosis.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Joint hypermobility is a common problem, particularly in women, and can cause significant morbidity to a minority of affected patients. In women, hormonal changes during menstruation, pregnancy and menopause can impact on symptoms of joint hypermobility, while manipulation of hormones can have both positive and negative effects for patients.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Joint hypermobility is a common problem, particularly in women, and can cause significant morbidity to a minority of affected patients. In women, hormonal changes during menstruation, pregnancy and menopause can impact on symptoms of joint hypermobility, while manipulation of hormones can have both positive and negative effects for patients.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 19 March 2013
Over 130 delegates, sponsors and exhibitors were in Sheffield to attend the latest Annual Conference of the Primary Care Women’s Health Forum (PCWHF). The meeting focused on how to ensure high quality in care. This key issue at the heart of women’s health today was epitomised by the winning entry to the latest PCWHJ Best Practice Award.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
All women, if they live long enough, will go through the menopause. For some women, especially if they have few symptoms, the menopause transition comes as a welcome relief from menstruation and the possibility of pregnancy. Others experience disabling menopausal symptoms, and may feel psychological distress from their loss of fertility. Supporting these women is one of the most rewarding parts of clinical practice, especially as there is now a much more balanced approach, at least among knowledgeable clinicians,1 to the risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
No one working in primary care can be unaware of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). QOF includes a number of domains for chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, cancer, diabetes and, for the first time in 2012 – osteoporosis. This website, produced jointly by the National Osteoporosis Society (NOS) and the Royal College of General Practitioners, offers guidance and resources on all aspects of the QOF relating to the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are very common, affecting about half of women at least once in their lifetime. Although UTIs can be painful and uncomfortable, they are usually limited in duration and treatable with antibiotics. The challenges are to manage the one in five women who experience recurrent UTIs, and to avoid complications in patients who do not respond to treatment.
Category: Editorial

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