Focusing on Women's Health from Puberty to Menopause.

Editorial

Tuesday, 04 December 2012
The most common sexually transmitted infection in the UK, anogenital warts are caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). They are usually painless, but women often find their presence unsightly and distressing. Choice of treatment depends on the type, number and distribution of the warts, and the patient’s preferences. Relapse is common, but women can be reassured that the vast majority of lesions are benign.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
The popularity of the contraceptive implant among younger women has contributed greatly to the recent increase in the use of long-acting reversible methods. Based on his 12 years of experience in counselling patients and fitting the implant, the author advises on how to avoid the pitfalls to ensure success with this method of contraception.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
For most women, pregnancy is a normal, life-affirming process, but there may be complications for some mothers and babies. Raised blood pressure can harm both babies and mothers-to-be, and is a leading cause of maternal death as well as fetal loss. These deaths are avoidable, so it is vital for GPs and practice nurses to recognise and know how to manage hypertension in pregnancy.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) prompts one in 20 women aged 30-49 years to visit their general practitioner. There are many treatment options for HMB, but endometrial ablation is recommended before hysterectomy when symptoms do not respond to medical treatment. This article discusses NovaSure, a method of endometrial ablation that may have advantages for some patients.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
Safeguarding – protecting a person’s health, wellbeing and human rights to enable them to live free of harm, abuse and neglect – is fundamental to health and social care. But sometimes in clinical practice the situation and the appropriate response are not clear-cut, and careful consideration is needed before sharing concerns about a young person’s sexual activity and relationship.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
In the UK, under the Abortion Act 1967, an abortion (termination of pregnancy; TOP) can only be carried out by a hospital or a specialised licensed clinic.
Category: Editorial
Tuesday, 04 December 2012
It is a pleasure to write the latest news about the Primary Care Women’s Health Forum (PCWHF), knowing that in a time of such austerity we have succeeded in making further progress with our objectives this year. And we have even more ambitious plans for the Forum in 2013 to promote women's health in primary care.
Category: Editorial
Monday, 22 October 2012
Botulinum toxin A effectively treats symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) with high rates of patient satisfaction, according to questionnaire study from a UK centre. A total of 60 women (median age 59 years) with OAB treated at University Hospital of North Staffordshire received botulinum toxin injections into the detrusor muscle. All had been unsuccessfully treated with urinary incontinence medications and most had received physiotherapy. According to results of a questionnaire sent after botulinum toxin treatment, 50% of the patients experienced improved symptoms within one week, with a further 30% showing improvement between two weeks and four months after the procedure. Symptom improvement lasted between zero and nine months for 53% of the patients. Three-quarters of the patients noted that the botulinum toxin injections were “very effective, effective or moderately effective” in treating their symptoms. Patients also expressed high satisfaction, with 73% commenting that the injection exceeded or met their expectations and 80% saying they would repeat the treatment if required. ACTION These results suggest that botulinum toxin A may provide a valuable alternative treatment for OAB. Current NICE guidance advises that botulinum toxin A should be only used in women who have not responded to lifestyle interventions, bladder retraining and pharmacological treatment and who are willing and able to self-catheterise. References Rigby J et al. Int J Gynecol Obst 2012:119(Suppl 3): S463 (A0573) NICE guidelines on the management of urinary incontinence in women. October 2006. http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/10996/30282/30282.pdf
Category: Editorial

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