Focusing on Women's Health from Puberty to Menopause.

Editorial

Saturday, 01 October 2011
It looks like it is going to be a long hard winter. The media have already been reporting restrictions on referrals and rising waiting times. It is likely that things can only get worse given the pressures on primary care trusts and local authorities. At times of economic stringency, women’s sexual and reproductive health can seem an easy target. But this is short-sighted and probably not costeffective given the UK’s high rates of teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. It is time for an approach to service configuration that goes beyond knee-jerk slash and burn.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Twenty-five years ago, few healthcare professionals associated osteoporosis with an increased risk of broken bones, and there was no internationally recognised definition of the disease. There were no NHS dual X-ray absorptiometry scanners, treatment options were limited, and the care and support offered to those with osteoporosis was a long way below the standards delivered by health professionals today. There was also no UK-wide charity to raise awareness of the disease.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Most often described as a burning pain, vulvodynia is a chronic pain syndrome that affects all or part of the vulva. Diagnosis of this distressing condition is frequently delayed and management is challenging. But careful diagnosis and appropriate referral can help to minimise pain and enable women to regain control of their lives.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Colposcopy – detailed examination of the cervix under magnification – remains the standard assessment tool for cervical abnormalities found on screening. An invitation to attend the colposcopy clinic can cause anxiety, but women can be reassured that it is a safe procedure and that many problems can be treated in just one visit.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Have you ever felt like it is groundhog day? You are having the same conversation with the same patient and with the same outcomes. You are being very sympathetic and trying hard to help the patient make positive changes. But every suggestion you make garners the response: “Yes but I can’t do that because...”, “Yes but I’ve tried that”, “Yes but my friend said there was a tablet I could take”. That “yes but” is an indicator that motivational interviewing (MI) is likely to be helpful.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Urinary continence problems are common in women, and result in significant costs to patients, carers and the NHS, both for treatment and coping strategies such as pads and appliances. Despite this, continence rarely gets the attention that some other, less prevalent conditions receive, and there is evidence of both under-diagnosis and inadequate management.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Half of post-menopausal women will suffer a fracture during their lifetime, mainly because of osteoporosis. Currently available medication can halve the risk of future osteoporotic fractures. Yet many at-risk women are still unidentified, and only half of all patients persist with treatment for more than a year.
Category: Editorial
Saturday, 01 October 2011
Many people have close relatives with cancer, and the possibility of inherited risk is increasingly raised during a GP consultation, often by patients themselves. It is important to identify the small but significant proportion of people who are at greatly increased risk of developing cancer as a result of their family history. But most patients with a family history are not at higher risk, and can be managed in primary care.
Category: Editorial

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